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Home > Academics > Modern Languages & Cultures > Courses

Modern Languages & Cultures Courses
French | German | Japanese | Spanish | English (Second Language) | Advanced

Arabic Courses

101,102 Arabic I and II. Two semester sequence of courses designed as an introduction to the Arabic Language. The focus is on language proficiency in all areas of the language including speaking, reading, and writing. The course also introduces students to aspects of Arabic culture and life in the Middle East.

French Courses

101 French I. Development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French and the foundation for understanding the cultures of French-speaking countries. Activities include readings and in-class discussions.

102 French II. Development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in French and the foundation for understanding the cultures of French-speaking countries. Activities include readings and in-class discussions.

201 French III. Review and further development of speaking, listening, reading, writing and cultural understanding skills. Readings on cultures of French-speaking peoples and representative French-language literary works.

210 French-speaking Cultures of Africa and the Caribbean. An introduction to the countries of Africa and the Caribbean formly colonized by France. TOpics include colonization and decolonization; political, economic, and social life; changing identities; linguistic diversity; globalization and relationship with the West.

220 Intermediate French Conversation. Development of speaking and comprehension skills in French, through pronunciation practice, review of grammar and structures, vocabulary-building activities, dialogues, individual reports, discussions, enhanced with use of audio-visual aids.

310 Contemporary Francophone Cultures and Literatures. A cross-cultural perspective on French-speaking areas of the world today, including France, Quebec, Africa and the Caribbean. Representative examples of francophone literature and film since the era of World War II. May be repeated once for credit.

320 French Literature and Culture through 1850. The development of French civilization, language and literature from their origins through the Renaissance, Classical Age, Age of Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Romantic generation. May be repeated once for credit.

330 French Literature and Culture from 1850 to 1950. The development of modern society, literature and the arts, including film, from Realism, Naturalism and Symbolism through the surrealist revolution and existentialism in the context of the emergence of science and industry and two world wars. Authors may include Flaubert, Zola, Maupassant, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Gide, Proust, Apollinaire, Colette, Eluard, Sartre and Camus. May be repeated once for credit.

340 The French-Speaking World. Overview of the history, geography, societies and institutions of the French-speaking peoples throughout the world. This course will help students to prepare for the Michigan Teacher Certification Test in French, although participation is not limited to Teacher Education students.

350 Advanced French Language. Process and steps for writing successfully in French, including help with peer coaching and peer editing. Listening, speaking and reading skills integrated with writing skills. Repeatable once for credit.

360 Advanced French Conversation.
Pronunciation practice, oral review of complex structures, vocabulary building, individual reports, and dialogues. Discussions of current events in French-speaking countries, using French-language newspapers and videos as source materials. Repeatable once for credit.


German Courses
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101 German I. Development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in German, while investigating the cultures of the new Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

102 German II. Development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in German, while investigating the cultures of the new Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

201 German III. Further development of aural-oral, reading, writing and cultural recognition skills, with readings and discussions, in German, of literature representative of the German-speaking peoples of Europe.

202 German IV. Further development of the four skills. Current German media used to develop vocabulary and fluency. Development of professional and business langiage as needed. Regular readings and discussion, in German, of German history from the nineteenth century to the present.

220 Intermediate German Conversation. Development of speaking and comprehension skills in German, through pronunciation practice, review of grammar and structures, vocabulary-building activities, dialogues, individual reports, discussions, enhanced with use of audio-visual aids.

310 German Literature and Culture (800-1850). Historical and cultural survey of German literature from its medieval beginnings to Romanticism and the age of revolution. Literature will be chosen to trace a cultural theme through history. Readings and overarching theme change.

320 German Literature and Culture (1850-1932). Historical and cultural survey of German literature from emergence of the German nation state to the Weimar Republic. Literature will be chosen to trace a cultural theme through history. Readings and overarching theme change.

330 German Literature and Culture after 1933. A literary examination of the Holocaust, Third Reich, and divided Germany. The impact of this history on contemporary German literature and scoiety will also be explored. Readings will change every other year. Repeatable once for credit with new content.

340 The German-Speaking World. Overview of the history, geography, societies and institutions of the German-speaking peoples throughout the world. This course will help students to prepare for the Michigan Teacher Certification Test in German, although it is not limited to Teacher Education students.

350 Advanced German Language. Special problems in German language acquisition, including structural and vocabulary issues. Thematic focus on scientific and business German. Repeatable once for credit.

360 Advanced German Conversation.
Contemporary problems and events in the German-speaking countries of Europe, as contrasted with those of the United States, through use of newspapers, magazines, radio and television broadcasts. Repeatable once for credit.


Japanese Courses
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101 Japanese I.
Development of basic proficiency in speaking, reading and writing Japanese. Format varies from self-taught to small-group instruction, depending on personnel available. When self-taught, students use the language laboratory to listen to tapes that accompany the textbook and practice speaking several times a week with a native or near-native speaker of Japanese. Fall, spring.

102 Japanese II.
Development of basic proficiency in speaking, reading and writing Japanese. Format varies from self-taught to small-group instruction, depending on personnel available. When self-taught, students use the language laboratory to listen to tapes that accompany the textbook and practice speaking several times a week with a native or near-native speaker of Japanese. Fall, spring.

201, 202 Japanese III and IV.
Further development and improvement of skills learned in Beginning Japanese. Format varies from self-taught to small-group instruction, depending on personnel available. When self-taught, the course is comprised of text, tapes and oral practice with a native or near-native speaker.

350 Advanced Japanese Language. Listening, reading, and speaking skills integrated with writing. Emphasis is on kanji acquisition and writing in Japanese. Repeatable once for credit.


Spanish Courses
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101 Spanish I. Development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Spanish, with an introduction to Hispanic cultures.

102 Spanish II. Development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Spanish, with an introduction to Hispanic cultures.

201 Spanish III. Review and continued development of the four skills, now with topical essays and literature selections as the basis for written work and discussion.

202 Spanish IV. Additional development of the four language skills in Spanish, through reading, writing, films and televison, and the discussion of current events. Emphasis will be placed on achieving a greater familiarity with the lingustic diversity and varied cultures of the Spanish-speaking peoples in the U.S., Latin America, and Spain.

215 Professional Spanish. For future professionals who plan to use Spanish in the workplace. While common language functions are practiced together, students also work individually to develop vocabulary and language skills specific to business, social services and education.

220 Intermediate Spanish Conversation.
Development of speaking and comprehension skills in Spanish, through pronunciation practice, review of grammar and structures, vocabulary-building activities, dialogues, individual reports, discussions, enhanced with use of audio-visual aids.

310 Peninsular Spanish Literature and Culture. Reading and discussion of major works of Spain and their cultural relevance. The course addresses higher-level language skills in Spanish while developing a knowledge base of Spanish literature and culture. Repeatable once for credit.

320 Spanish-American Literatures and Cultures. Reading and discussion of major works of Mexico and Central and South America and their cultural relevance. The course addresses higher-level language skills in Spanish while developing a knowledge base of Spanish-American literatures and cultures. Repeatable once for credit.

330 Contemporary Hispanic Literatures and Cultures. An examination of recent and current events as they have influenced the cultures and literatures of the Spanish-speaking world. Includes reading and discussion of contemporary prose, poetry and drama by Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Hispanic writers. Repeatable once for credit.

340 The Spanish-Speaking World. Overviews of the history, geop\graphy, societies and institutions of the Spanish-speaking peoples throughout the world. This course will help students to prepare for the Michigan Teacher Certification Test in Spanish, althought it is not limited to Teacher Education students.

350 Advanced Spanish Language. Listening, speaking and reading integrated with writing skills. Emphasis is on the process and steps for writing successfully in Spanish. Repeatable once for credit.

360 Advanced Spanish Conversation. Newspapers, magazines, television and radio as source material for topics discussed. Repeatable once for credit.

 

American Sign Language

101, 102 American Sign Language I and II. Development of basic to intermediate signing skills, as well as an introduction to the grammar and history of ASL. Readings and discussions will also instill an understanding of the culture of the deaf and hearing-impaired communities in the United States and abroad.


English as a Second Language Classes top

101 English as a Second Language I. For students whose native language is not English. Basic English grammar and classroom practice in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Fall and spring as needed.

102 English as a Second Language II. Continued study of ESL. Grammar review when necessary. Continued drill in the four basic skills with classroom reports, interviews, discussion and informal conversation to build confidence and proficiency. Fall and spring as needed.


Advanced and Special Classes top

199 Exploratory Internship.

250 Special Topics.
Designed particularly for non-majors, the course can be repeated with a different topic.

299 Experimental Course.

399 Professional Internship.

451 Independent Study.
Advanced study in areas beyond regular course offerings.

490 Study Abroad Capstone Seminar. Students returning from a study abroad semester will present a portfolio of journals and essays to reflect on their experiecne. Specific topics to be addressed: The relationship between language and culture, the student's self-understanding as a language learner, and the impact of the study-abroad experience on the student's chosen career as a teacher or professional. Required for Teacher Ed majors and minors, recommended for other language majors.

491 Senior Research.
Majors conduct extensive research on a topic of their choosing and in conjunction with their advisor primarily in the target language. A bibliography and a 3-5-page prospectus is presented to the Department.

492 Senior Research Presentation.
Twenty-page paper in the target language according to MLA style, along with a 3-5-page English summary, presented to the Department and the College.

499 Advanced Experimental Course.

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